Review: Deccan Advocate Junior

The Numbers:
Weight: 21g
Length (capped): 143.19mm
Length (uncapped): 132.45mm
Length of cap: 70.31mm
Available at: Deccan Pen Stores
Body Material: Ebonite
Nib Material: Stainless steel
Filling Mechanism: Eyedropper
Colours: Green, Brown, Tan, Black

Intro:
The Deccan Advocate Junior is a pen gifted to me by my friend Gautam of Singapore Fountain Pen Lovers. He purchased this pen for me after showing me his collection of Deccan Pens. This review cannot be of a pen that came straight from the shop because my friend has smoothened the nib before passing the pen to me. Keep this in mind as you read this review.

Getting a Deccan pen outside of India is not an easy thing. They do not have a website up yet and the only way to get official information is via their Facebook page or by calling their shop. If you do not mind getting pens from the second hand market, I have seen a couple floating around on the Fountain Pen Network and FP Geeks’ Classified section.

Performance:
The Deccan Advocate Junior is an ebonite fountain pen. Ebonite is a type of rubber. It is typically used in the manufacturing of bowling balls and saxophone mouth pieces. Ebonite might have a distinctive odour which the Deccan Advocate Junior does not have.

The Deccan Advocate Junior doesn’t have any branding on the pen to identify the pen’s brand or model. Mine is a green ebonite fountain pen accented with silver clip and centre band. The ebonite body is polished to a smooth and shiny finish. The pen has flat ends with its cap slightly larger than the body. The barrel tapers down to a slightly smaller diameter.

The clip is feels thin and as if it might bend if excessive force was applied to it. In practice, I do not face any issues with it. The cap unscrews after 6 revolutions. This is rather excessive in my opinion. Most pens uncap in about 2 revolutions. It is not a major issue but I think this is a flaw. Every time I reach towards the Deccan Advocate Junior, I get mildly irritated by the number of turns that it takes to uncap the pen. This makes me want to use it less.

The pen body, without posting the cap, is of a comfortable length and weight. It is well balanced and light enough to not be taxing during long writing sessions. The grip section is concave and guides your finger to a comfortable grip. The threads though numerous are neither sharp nor painful to have your hand on them. However if you are so inclined, you are post the cap on the end of the barrel though I thought it makes the pen looks overly long.

The Deccan Advocate Junior is an eyedropper fountain pen which means the body acts as the reservoir that holds the ink. While this means the fountain pen has a huge ink capacity, it also means the feed wouldn’t be saturated when the pen is filled. I found I had to wait a long time before the feed was saturated enough for me to start writing. This was after keeping the pen nib down in my pen holder too. Another problem I faced with eyedropper pens, I realised that they do not take to travelling very well. I travel on my motorbike to and from work with my fountain pens. Most of my pens have no major ink burps or splatter into their caps after such a trip. However, the Deccan Advocate Junior really doesn’t take to travelling at all. I constantly find ink on the grip. I am pretty sure this is a fountain pen that’s going to stay home permanently.

The nib is a gold plated iridium point stainless steel nib. Deccan Pen Stores seems to only offer their pens in a single nib size. Like I mentioned above, my pen was smoothened by my friend before he gifted it to me. My Deccan Advocate Junior is a smooth and wet writer. It writes like a wet medium. Be careful not to press down too hard on your nib, this isn’t a soft nib, the nib isn’t made for flexing. I learnt this the hard way when I attempted to squeeze some line variation from the nib. I managed to misalign the tines but luckily I was able to fix it.

Conclusion:
The Deccan Advocate Junior is a well made Indian fountain pen with a few flaws. They are not really deal breakers but they can be quite irksome. I am not sure about the cost of a Deccan Advocate Junior but from experience Indian fountain pens are very affordable. If the price is affordable, the Deccan Advocate Junior would be a nice desk pen with its smooth writing experience as well as the large ink capacity.

My thanks once again to Gautam for the gift!

Pros:
* Large ink capacity as an eyedropper pen
* Well balanced and light
* Smooth writing experience
* No ebonite odour

Cons:
* Doesn’t travel well
* Takes 6 turns to uncap!

Posted on December 4, 2015 and filed under Fountain Pen, review.